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SAA assignments

Submit the form on this page to request your Student Academic Appointment assignment. Spring 2023 SAA opportunities include:

Blotkamp; T, TH 4:45-6:00 p.m. (web, 125 seats)

Introduces ways media producers and advertisers conceptualize and measure audiences. Examines strategies and criteria used to evaluate media as advertising delivery vehicles. Covers skills needed to utilize market research and match media with products, services, and behavioral campaign goals.

TBD

Guins; M, W 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

Critical examination of advertising's role in modern societies. Focuses on marketing and consumption as central activities in shaping personal identity and social relations.

Clavio; T, TH 9:45 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Introduces key concepts, historical elements, and future considerations within the areas of sports and media, emphasizing how these two fields interact. Geared toward preparation for careers in sports journalism and sports media.

Geiger; M, W 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. (18 total sections)

Paul; T, TH 10:20 a.m.-11:10 a.m.

Paul; T, TH 9:10 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Examines the role media play in our lives — at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers — and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence.

Conway; T, TH 1:15-2:30 p.m.

A robust introduction to the field of journalism and the underlying principles of journalism. Explores the role of journalists and media in American society, the influences of news and entertainment media on audiences, and the role of journalism in modern media environments.

French; M 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Pulitzer-winning reporters and other award-winning journalists visit the class to share behind-the-scene details of their projects, their ethical choices and the doubts and challenges they faced along the way. The class explores how journalistic prizes are selected and how they shape the future, not just of journalism, but of democracy.

Pierce; F 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m. (125 seats)

Pulitzer-winning reporters and other award-winning journalists visit the class to share behind-the-scene details of their projects, their ethical choices and the doubts and challenges they faced along the way. The class explores how journalistic prizes are selected and how they shape the future, not just of journalism, but of democracy.

Groobert; M, W 1:15-2:30 p.m. (175 seats)

Introduction to public relations. Examines theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, and its impact on stakeholders and society. Topics include approaches to persuasion, media relations, crisis communication, reputation management, and ethics.

Jamison-Koenig; M, W 3:00-4:15 p.m. (175 seats)

Examines principles of media advertising and applications across platforms and audiences. Analyzes the advertising industry structures and processes, including the roles of agencies, creative teams, station representatives, and buyers. Topics include the social and individual effects of advertising, ethical issues in advertising, and considerations for advertising in a global marketplace.

Castronova; T 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Intro to Games is the starting course in the BSc major in Game Design. The course focuses on the student's understanding of complex game mechanics. Game mechanics are taught in two forms. 1) Game Theory is a mathematical science of designing and analyzing incentive structures in strategic interactions. 2) Board games provide practical examples of complex mechanics in action. Through this combination of practical and theoretical exposure to complexity in game mechanics, the following learning outcomes will be achieved. 1) Students will be able to design abstract game theoretical models of strategic situations. 2) Student will be able to quickly analyze and understand complex rules systems. Format: In the first hour, lectures on game theory and systems theory will be given. This subject matter is mathematical in nature. In the remaining two hours, students will collaborate to learn a complex board game, with instructor guidance and help. This material requires logic, attention to detail, concentration, memory, and ability to work with others. Grading: 500 points total. Two midterms @ 100 points each. A final exam @ 200 points. Attendance @100 points. Workload: Outside of class, students will have mandatory homework in the form of specific games they must learn. In addition, problem sets, with answers, will be provided so that students can practice the math problems that will be on the tests. These problem sets are not graded and are optional. Overall, course success will require a great deal of personal responsibility and initiative. Prior game knowledge is not necessary, however, a willingness to wrestle with complicated game systems is a must.

Velez; T, TH 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. (100 seats)

Examines the construction of social meaning associated with mediated messages as well as the range of uses of and consequences of exposure to mediated messages in individual groups, organizations, and society.

Grabe; T, TH 1:15-2:30 p.m. (100 seats)

Examines the construction of social meaning associated with mediated messages as well as the range of uses of and consequences of exposure to mediated messages in individual groups, organizations, and society.

Martins; M, W 1:15-2:30 p.m.

Examines the representation of women in the media and analyzes women's creative work as media producers from a social scientific perspective. The course will include lecture and discussion of areas of critical debate: visual representation across media platforms, women's employment in media industries; women as an audience/consumer group.

Smith; T, TH 3:00-4:15 p.m. (125 seats)

Examination of the social and financial relationships between sports organizations, media and society. Study of the social implications of sports media content in light of economic connections between sports media and college and professional sports teams, including how television contracts influence media coverage and how organization-based media influence audience perception.

Francalancia; M, W 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. (144 seats)

Provides a conceptual framework for writing, designing, and evaluating a variety of media products. Media program design is not a hands-on production course but does offer an overview of the production process. Topics include scriptwriting, production design, visualization, composition, editing styles, and others.

Bell; T, TH 4:45-6:00 p.m.

Introduction to the power, pleasure, politics, and possibilities of cinema. Opportunity to develop film literacy through a better understanding of how film is and has been constructed and experienced. Provides critical techniques for analyzing and appreciating the many forms film has taken.

Layton, B; M, W 9:45-11:00 a.m. (6 sections)

Intensive, hands-on course introduces storytelling skills, techniques and tools for effective media creation in a digital, multi-platform environment and provides the knowledge and skills needed for success in higher-level, more specialized courses of study across the Media School curriculum, including advertising, digital media, journalism, and public relations.

Layton, S; T, TH 9:45-11:00 a.m. (6 sections)

Intensive, hands-on course introduces storytelling skills, techniques and tools for effective media creation in a digital, multi-platform environment and provides the knowledge and skills needed for success in higher-level, more specialized courses of study across the Media School curriculum, including advertising, digital media, journalism, and public relations.

 

Shanahan; M, W 3:00-4:15 p.m.

This class uses television sitcoms from the 1950s onward to explore depictions of social and cultural life in America. Issues examined include representations of family life, work life, gender roles, racial relations, and selected specific issues such as abortion and drug use.Theories and research that examine media both as reflection and as cause of social change are presented in the class.

Fargo; T, TH 4:45-6:00 p.m. (125 seats)

History and philosophy of laws pertaining to free press and free speech. Censorship, libel, contempt, obscenity, right of privacy, copyright, government regulations, and laws affecting the Internet and social media. Stresses responsibilities and freedoms in a democratic communications systems.

Major; M, W 1:15-2:30 p.m. (125 seats)

Examines the world of media related to fashion, beauty, and lifestyle (FBL). Focuses on cultural influence, media history, sustainability, and the future of FBL. Includes analysis of bodies of knowledge associated with past and present expressions of human behaviors, beliefs, and experiences related to FBL.

Questions?

Contact Leah Wolfe, graduate studies administrative associate.