Centers, Affiliates & Partners

Centers and institutes

Black Film Center/Archive

The Black Film Center/Archive is dedicated to collecting, preserving and making available historically and culturally significant films by and about black people.

The center houses hundreds of thousands of hours of films, ranging from forgotten documentaries to blockbuster movies, as well as posters and other printed creative materials.

Students and scholars can take tours, conduct research and attend screenings and other special events.

Description of the video:

[Video: Upbeat music plays]
[Video: The IU trident against a white background. Words appear: The Media School Indiana University. ]

 

[Video: A plaque that reads “The Media School Black Film Center/Archive.” An old camera sits in front of the sign.]

 

Francis speaks: I was a graduate student at the University of Chicago.

 

[Video: Francis speaking to an audience.]

 

Francis speaks: I heard about the Black Film Center/Archive,

 

[Video: Terri Francis sitting in the screening room, speaking to the camera]

[Video: Words appear: Terri Francis, Director of the Black Film Center/Archive]

 

Francis speaks: and so when I became a professor at Yale University, I came here to do research for an article that I was doing

 

[Video: Francis speaking with two others in the BFC/A.]

 

Francis speaks: and it actually expanded my idea of what black film was.

 

[Video: Ronda Sewald speaks to the camera in the BFC/A.]

 

Sewald speaks: We’re, I believe, the earliest archive for black film and I believe the only one specializing in black film.

 

[Video: Sewald opens a door to a room with archived materials.]

[Video: Shelves lined with materials.]

Sewald speaks: So for instance, if someone wanted to study

 

[Video: Film reels in metal containers on a shelf]

 

Sewald speaks: representations of African Americans in film over time

 

[Video: Sewald moves framed film posters]

 

Sewald speaks: we have a lot of promotional materials.

[Video: Ronda Sewald speaks to the camera in the BFC/A.]


Sewald speaks: When we have people that really want to get into the history of black film, I mean you could screen films for days, maybe weeks, here.

 

 

[Video: The camera moves along a shelf, showing films available in the BFC/A.]

 

Francis speaks: Hundreds of thousands of hours

 

[Video: Terri Francis sitting in the screening room, speaking to the camera]

 

Francis speaks: of just creativity

 

[Video: Archived materials, including DVDs and boxes, in the BFC/A.]

 

Francis speaks: of writing, of films,

 

[Video: A Sony film reel]

 

Francis speaks: films, long films, documentaries,

 

[Video: A framed handprint – black ink on a white paper with a signature beneath the handprint]

 

Francis speaks: experimental films, narrative films, blockbusters,

 

[Video: Promotional posters for films]

 

Francis speaks: forgotten films.

 

[Video: A magazine article and photo of Phil Moore]

 

Francis speaks: We have all of the other words

 

[Video: a black and white photograph of three people sitting at a table]

 

Francis speaks: that are left out of popular cinema that we see every day.

 

[Video: Two images showing men standing at podiums]

 

Francis speaks: We really are unique in that as a center

 

[Video: The cover of a booklet from the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame 1975.]

 

Francis speaks: and an archive, we collect and kind of

 

[Video: A signed poster of “The Scar of Shame: A Renèe Baker Project”]

 

Francis speaks: preserve the past, but we're also very engaged

 

[Video: A promotional poster for Spike Lee’s “Clockers” film.]

 

Francis speaks: with the present day.

 

[Video: Students in the Black Film Center/Archive]

 

Francis speaks: And there are lots of ways for students to engage. Students can

 

[Video: A female student in the Black Film Center/Archive]

 

Francis speaks: do tours of the archive,

 

[Video: The entrance the Moving Image Collections and Archives, which houses the BFC/A, in the Herman B Wells library]

 

Francis speaks: where we can just show them a little bit of an example

 

[Video: A close up of the Moving Image Collections sign.]

 

Francis speaks: of what we have to offer.

 

[Video: Posters of films in the BFC/A]

 

Francis speaks: Posters, you know short films, and other kinds of objects that we have.

 

[Video: The entrance to the screening room.]

 

Sewald speaks: We also bring in filmmakers and archivists

 

[Video: A poster for an event at the BFC/A that focused on Black Film: Nontheatrical.]

 

Sewald speaks: from other film collections to speak about their work, so anyone that wanted to do you know essentially the history of black film

 

[Video: A guest lecturer in the screening room.]

 

Sewald speaks: particularly independent filmmaking, this would be a

 

[Video: The audience of a guest speaker in the screening room]

 

Sewald speaks: really important center to visit.

 

[Video: Sewald speaks to the camera in the BFC/A.]

 

Sewald speaks: We’re a really great place to come and immerse yourself in the history.

 

[Video: Terri Francis sitting in the screening room, speaking to the camera]

 

Francis speaks: You can see a lot of these movies anywhere. You can see them on Netflix

 

[Video: An old comic strip]

Francis speaks: in your apartment by yourself.

[Video: Sheet music]

 

What we're saying is come and see these films with us. Come see them

 

[Video: Participants in a discussion at the BFC/A]

 

[Video: Terri Francis sitting in the screening room, speaking to the camera]

 

Francis speaks: Come see them in the context of other films from the African Diaspora. It kind of lets you make connections that wouldn't otherwise be there.

 

[Video: Words appear: Video by Kelly Obbie]

[Video: Words appear: Meeting footage courtesy of Larmie Sanyon]

[Video: Words appear: Music: “Inspired” and “Nowhere Land” by Kevin MacLeod. icompetch.com]

 [Video: A white background with a red tab on the top, displaying the IU trident.]

[Video: Words appear: Indiana University]

[Video: Words appear: Fulfilling the Promise]

[Video: Words appear: iu.edu]

 [END OF TRANSCRIPT]

Center for Documentary Research and Practice

The Center for Documentary Research and Practice supports faculty and graduate students from across the university who are working on an array of nonfiction media projects, including documentaries.

It also serves as a research hub for those doing historical, theoretical and critical research on nonfiction film and video and can provide technical and creative assistance.

Visit the CDRP's website

Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies

The Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies focuses on legal protection for media rights in Indiana, the United States and the world.

In addition to conducting its own research, the center:

  • Helps other researchers find partners and funding
  • Matches students with internships at press freedom organizations in the United States and abroad
  • Develops curricula for journalism and mass communication programs at universities in the developing world
  • Organizes and co-sponsors seminars and events related to free expression
Visit CIMLAPS's website

Institute for Communication Research

The Institute for Communication Research works with faculty and students to facilitate social scientific research.

In the ICR, researchers design questionnaires, experiments and surveys; measure psychological factors; and conduct content analysis about the media. It offers:

  • Four psychophysiological data collection labs
  • Two survey research rooms
  • One focus group room, interview room and content analysis room
  • One data analysis room equipped with digital video and audio editing suites, as well as physiology, eye tracking and facial coding analysis software.

Description of the video:

 

[Video: Upbeat music plays]
[Video: The IU trident against a white background. Words appear: The Media School Indiana University.]

 

[Video: Rob Potter speaks to the camera]

[Video: Words appear: Rob Potter ICR Director]

 

Potter speaks: ICR is the place where social science research is done in The Media School, and so what we try and encourage is a place for

 

[Video: A student working on a computer]


Potter speaks: graduate students or undergraduates or faculty to bring their ideas to try

 

[Video: Sensors are placed on a female participant’s face around the eye area during data collection in the ICR]

 

Potter speaks: and test out hypotheses that they have about the impact of media on people

 

[Video: Sensors on a participant’s hand]

 

Potter speaks: the impact of different individual differences on how people make sense of media, how they choose media

 

[Video: Cartoon elves on a screen during a study]

 

Potter speaks: what the media does to them, to their attitudes, to their attention

 

[Video: A screen measuring data from participants in a study]

 

Potter speaks: to their excitement, to where their eyes move on the screen.

 

[Video: Rob Potter speaks to the camera]

 

Potter speaks: We have a whole bunch of different tools that people can use to investigate the questions that they have. So what we try to do is

 

[Video: A screen collecting data during a study]

 

Potter speaks: take people's ideas that that they want to investigate and figure out a way

 

[Videos: Students working in the ICR]

 

Potter speaks: that they can get the answers that they want. So our job as an institute

 

[Video: Professor Potter discusses data while pointing to a screen]

 

Potter speaks: is to really try and streamline

 

[Video: A student looks at basketball footage on a computer]

 

Potter speaks: and make the path really easy for people to answer

 

[Video: Rob Potter speaks to the camera]

 

Potter speaks: the questions that they have about media.

 

[Video: Screen fades to black]

[Video: Words appear: Edited and sot by Anna Howell]

[Video: Words appear: Music by: Bensound/Bensound-happiness]

 

[Video: Music ends]

 

[Video: A white background with a red tab on the top, displaying the IU trident.]

[Video: Words appear: Indiana University]

[Video: Words appear: Fulfilling the Promise]

[Video: Words appear: iu.edu]

Michael I. Arnolt Center for Investigative Journalism

Beginning fall 2019, The Media School will be home to the Michael I. Arnolt Center for Investigative Journalism. Funded by a $6 million gift from alumnus Michael Arnolt (BA’67, journalism), the center will teach and produce high-quality investigative journalism for the state of Indiana and beyond.

The center will conduct multimedia investigative reporting on issues of importance to Indiana residents, including matters that reach beyond the state’s borders. Its work will be available at no cost to local, regional and national news outlets and will seek to supplement their reporting at a time when many are losing newsroom staff. Master of Science and undergraduate students will do the reporting, providing them with an opportunity to learn in a real-world setting.

Visit the Arnolt Center’s website

National Sports Journalism Center

The National Sports Journalism Center connects students studying sports journalism at The Media School with the industry through internships, interactions with sports media professionals, extracurricular training and sponsored work-study opportunities.

The NSJC also engages in research related to sports journalism through on-campus and affiliated faculty members.

Visit the NSJC's website

Observatory on Social Media

The Observatory on Social Media investigates the role of media and technology in society, focusing on the spread of information and misinformation online. Its provides resources and training to help students, journalists and citizens identify attempts to intentionally manipulate information and sway public opinion.

Visit OSoME's website