February 6, 2018—February 11, 2018

WOUNDED GALAXIES
1968: Paris, Prague, Chicago

FESTIVAL + SYMPOSIUM
Bloomington, IN

Wounded Galaxies: 1968 – Beneath the Paving Stones, the Beach is a festival and symposium produced by The Burroughs Century Ltd., welcoming scholars, writers, artists, archivists, filmmakers, performers, and others interested in exploring the intellectual and aesthetic legacy of 1968, during its 50th Anniversary year. Programs focus on the events that occurred in Paris, Chicago, and Prague of ’68 and examine their relationship to, and resonance with current struggles in the US and around the world.

The festival subtitle is a translation of the French slogan “Sous les pavés, la plage!,” a popular resistance graffiti in France Mai ’68 that refers to both the sand beneath cobblestones lifted by students to hurl at police as well as the ‘Situationist’ conviction that the streets–the expression of capital and consumption–could be rediscovered by abandoning a regimented life.

CALL FOR PAPERS >

DEADLINE IS JULY 1, 2017

Pre-Conference Festival

Art, Film, Music, Performance—January 8 thru February 11, 2018
Download a full schedule

MONDAY // JANUARY 8

EXHIBITION OPENING // Lilly Library
Situationist exhibition opens
Free and open to the public
1200 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

EXHIBITION OPENING // Franklin Hall
Photo exhibit drawn from IU Archives
Free and open to the public
601 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

WEDNESDAY // JANUARY 24

7:00pm // SCREENING // Monroe County Public Library
Can Dialectics Break Bricks
 (René Viénet, 1973)
Free and open to the public
303 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

SUNDAY // JANUARY 28

2:30pm // SCREENING // Buskirk-Chumley Theater
Head (Bob Rafelson, 1968)
Hosted by Ryder Film Series
Tickets: $6/film, $10/both in advance; $8/film, $12/both at door
114 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

5:00pm // SCREENING // Buskirk-Chumley Theater
The Great Silence (Sergio Corbucci, 1968)
Hosted by Ryder Film Series
Tickets: $6/film, $10/both in advance; $8/film, $12/both at door
114 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

WEDNESDAY // JANUARY 31

7:00pm // SCREENING // Monroe County Public Library
Guy Debord In Girum Imus Nocte et Consumimur Igni (1978)
Free and open to the public
303 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

FRIDAY // FEBRUARY 2

6:00pm // OPENING // I Fell Gallery
Exhibition of prints by Rikki Ducornet
Free and open to the public
415 W 4th St, Bloomington, IN

7:00pm // READING // I Fell Gallery
Writings by Rikki Ducornet
Free and open to the public
415 W 4th St, Bloomington, IN

MONDAY // FEBRUARY 5

7:00pm // The Blockhouse
BIRTHDAY PARTY
 for William S. Burroughs
SCREENING
// Frédéric Moffett, Jean Genet in Chicago (2006, 26 minutes)
MUSICAL PERFORMANCE // Bloomington-based Urban Deer
Free and open to the public (The Burroughs Century will accept $5 suggested donations)
205 S College Ave, Bloomington, IN

Conference + Festival

February 6 through February 11, 2018
Download a full schedule

ONGOING

EXHIBITION // Lilly Library
Situationist
Free and open to the public
1200 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

EXHIBITION // Franklin Hall
Photo exhibit drawn from IU Archives
Free and open to the public
601 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

EXHIBITION // I Fell Gallery
Prints by Rikki Ducornet
Free and open to the public
415 W 4th St, Bloomington, IN

TUESDAY // FEBRUARY 6

7:00pm // SCREENING // IU Libraries Moving Image Archive, Room 048
The Society of the Spectacle (1974)
Introduction by Andy Uhrich
Free and open to the public
1320 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN

WEDNESDAY // FEBRUARY 7

2:00pm // PRIVATE TOURS // Lilly Library
Exhibition of Situationist materials led by Mehdi Mikael El Hajoui
Free and open to the public
1200 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

3:30pm // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Atrium
Lecture by Ward Shelley
Free and open to the public
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

4:00pm // SYMPOSIUM // Jacobs School of Music, MC066
Master class/Composition forum led by Annea Lockwood
Free and open to the public
205 S Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

5:30pm // PERFORMANCE // Dunn Meadow
Piano Burning
Annea Lockwood
Free and open to the public
N Indiana Ave and E 7th St., Bloomington, IN

8:00pm // RECEPTION // Franklin Hall, Commons
Free and open to the public
601 E Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, IN

THURSDAY // FEBRUARY 8

2:00pm // REGISTRATION // IU Cinema
Symposium Registration Begins
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

5:30pm // KEYNOTE ADDRESS // IU Cinema
Jim Hoberman
Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Series
Free and open to the public
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

7:00pm // SCREENING // IU Cinema
Night of the Living Dead (1969)
America (Third World Newsreel, 1969)
Introduction by J. Hoberman
Open to the public. Tickets: $4
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

10:00pm // PERFORMANCE // The Back Door
Ken Vandermark + Phillip Sudderberg performance
KCAI Sound Art Collaborative
Open to the public. Tickets: $5
205 S College Ave, Bloomington, IN

FRIDAY // FEBRUARY 9

8:00am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Coffee and Mingling
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

8:30am // SYMPOSIUM // IU Cinema
Panel #14
Punk, Pop and Resistance
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

10:15am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Panel #13
Cinétracts and the Limits of Reality
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

10:45am // SYMPOSIUM // IU Cinema
Panel #6
New Waves Panel
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

10:45am // SYMPOSIUM SCREENING // IU Libraries Moving Image Archive Screening Room
Documentary, Educational, and Experimental Films
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

11:30am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Panel #12
Vietnam Panel
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

1:00pm // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Lunch
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

1:00pm // SYMPOSIUM SCREENING // IU Libraries Moving Image Archive Screening Room
Documentary, Educational, and Experimental Films
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

2:00pm // SYMPOSIUM // IU Cinema
Panel #7
International Film Panel
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

2:00pm // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Panel #1
Personal Histories and Private Archives
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

3:00pm // KEYNOTE ADDRESS // IU Cinema
Greil Marcus
A Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker program
Free and open to the public
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

7:00pm // SCREENING // IU Cinema
Uptight! (Jules Dassin, 1968)
Black Panthers (Agnes Varda, 1968)
Introduction by J. Hoberman
Open to the public. Tickets: $4
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

10:00pm // PERFORMANCE // Jacobs School of Music, Ford Hall
Music composed by Annea Lockwood, Luciano Berio, and Julius Eastman
Free and open to the public
205 S Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

SATURDAY // FEBRUARY 10

8:15am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Lower Level
Coffee and Mingling
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

8:45am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Panel #4
Newsreel: Film and Revolution
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

8:45am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies, Room 1060
Panel #8
International Culture Panel
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

8:45am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies, Room GA0003
Panel #3
Preserving the Guerilla Television Movement
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

9:30am // SYMPOSIUM // IU Cinema
Panel #2
Italy’s Long ’68 and its Continuing Legacy
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

10:30am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Panel #9
Feminisms Panel
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

10:30am // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies, Room 1060
Panel #11
Performance and the Everyday
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

10:30am // SYMPOSIUM SCREENING // IU Libraries Moving Image Archive Screening Room
An Excavation of the Buried History of U.S. Situationist Films: Two Artifacts
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

12:00pm // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Lower Level
Lunch
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

1:30pm // KEYNOTE ADDRESS // IU Cinema
McKenzie Wark
Leaving the Twenty-First Century
Free and open to the public
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

3:00am // SYMPOSIUM SCREENING // IU Libraries Moving Image Archive Screening Room
Org
(Fernando Birri, 1979)
Introduced by Isabel Arredondo
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

3:30pm // SYMPOSIUM // IU Cinema
Panel #15
The Counter Culture, Surrealism and Cyberspace
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

3:30pm // SYMPOSIUM // School of Global and International Studies Auditorium
Panel #10
Geopolitical 1968
355 N Jordan Ave, Bloomington, IN

7:00pm // SCREENING // IU Cinema
La Chinoise (1967)
Invocation of My Demon Brother (Kenneth Anger, 1969)
Introduction by J. Hoberman
Open to the public. Tickets: $4
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

10:00pm // PERFORMANCE // The Blockhouse
The Muttering Sickness performs The Whole World is Watching
Open to the public; Tickets: $5
205 S College Ave, Bloomington, IN

SUNDAY // FEBRUARY 11

11:00am // SYMPOSIUM // IU Cinema
Brunch and Roundtable

3:00pm // SCREENING // IU Cinema
Daisies (1966)
Kusama Self- Obliteration (Jud Yalkut, 1967)
Introduction by J. Hoberman
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

6:30pm // SCREENING // IU Cinema
Skidoo (Otto Preminger, 1968)
Looking for Mushrooms (Bruce Conner, 1968)
Introduction by J. Hoberman
1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN

Venues

IU CINEMA

1213 E. 7th St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
jwvicker@indiana.edu
Tel: 812-855-7632

OTHER VENUES

THE BACK DOOR
205 S College Ave

THE BLOCKHOUSE
205 S College Ave

THE BUSKIRK-CHUMLEY THEATER
114 E Kirkwood Ave

THE I FELL BUILDING
415 W 4th St

DUNN MEADOW
N Indiana Ave and E 7th St

JACOBS SCHOOL OF MUSIC
205 S Jordan Ave

IU LIBRARIES MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVE
1320 E 10th St, Room 048

SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
355 N Jordan Ave

Travel

AIR TRAVEL TO BLOOMINGTON, IN USA

Indianapolis International Airport

Most attendees of Wounded Galaxies will elect to fly to the Indianapolis International Airport. Direct international flights maintain substantial connecting service from all major international hub airports within the US.

Airport Symbol: IND
Location: 50 miles (93 kilometers) north of Bloomington, IN

GROUND TRANSPORTATION from INDIANAPOLIS AIRPORT TO CAMPUS AND RETURN

Most Wounded Galaxies attendees will choose to travel from the airport to Bloomington via shuttle service. It is best to book tickets on-line in advance. Their departure location is easy to find outside the baggage claim area on the lower level of the airport.

SHUTTLE SERVICE

Go Express Travel

  • Service 9 times daily between the airport and Bloomington campus
  • Advance reservations: Recommended
  • Reservations on-line: www.goexpresstravel.com
  • Phone: 800.589.6004 or 812.332.6004
  • Rate: currently $20.00 one way
  • Airport pick-up location: Ground Transportation Center. Lower level, outside of airport Baggage Claim

LIMOUSINE SERVICE

Classic Touch Limousine

  • Door-to-door service from airport to any location in Bloomington
  • Advance reservations: Required
  • Rates: Currently $122.00 roundtrip per person. When making your reservations, inform Classic Touch that you are attending a conference at IU – Wounded Galaxies. Request an IU conference rate. Rate is for shared ride service; private car rate is not guaranteed
  • Reservations on-line: www.classictouchlimo.com
  • Phone: 800.319.0082 or 812.339.7269
  • Airport Pick-up Location: Ground Transportation Center. Lower level, outside of airport Baggage Claim
  • IMPORTANT: The limousine driver will NOT be waiting for you inside of the terminal baggage area. You must proceed to the Ground Transportation Center, locate a Classic Touch limousine and identify yourself to the driver.

CAR RENTAL: Most major car rental companies

DRIVING to IU BLOOMINGTON

We suggest that you consult Mapquest or Google maps for the best directions to Bloomington and return.  Driving to and from the airport to campus is simple and direct.  Driving time from the airport to campus is approximately 50 minutes.

PARKING

For attendees staying at the Indiana Memorial Union, parking is free.  Those electing to stay off campus may park in one of the two lots adjacent to the Indiana Memorial Union and pay the daily parking fee.  Discounted parking passes will be available at the registration check-in desk.  The approximate cost of discounted daily parking is $12.00.  You may also purchase a Temporary Permit on the conference registration form.  The Temporary Permit will allow you to park in many IU parking lots and garages, but it is not valid for in the IMU lots. 

Lodging

A block of hotel rooms on the IU Bloomington campus have been reserved for people attending the Wounded Galaxies 1968 Conference.

INDIANA MEMORIAL UNION (IMU)
900 East 7th Street
Bloomington, IN USA 47405
812.856. 6381

For your convenience, if you are looking for hotel accommodations, we suggest that you reserve a guestroom at the IMU.  The IMU is located in the center of campus and is in easy walking distance to many of Bloomington’s downtown shops, cafes and restaurants.  You can explore many of these options through the Visit Bloomington web site.

Rates & Reservations

In order to secure a hotel room at the Indiana Memorial Union, contact the hotel directly or reserve your room on-line.  When phoning for your reservation, you must identify that you will be attending the Wounded Galaxies 1968 Conference in order to obtain a room.

On-line reservation:
http://imu-indiana-edu.webhotel.microsdc.us/
Group Code:  GALAXIES1968

Phone reservations:
(812) 856-6381

Room rates:
current rooms rates vary from $134 – $189 depending on room type; rates are for the room itself and are not based on the number of people occupying the room.  All rooms are currently subject to a 12% tax.

Reservation cut-off date:
January 7, 2018

Parking:
free to hotel guests

Wireless Internet:
free

OFF CAMPUS ACCOMMODATIONS

Although we recommend that you stay at the IMU hotel, there are many hotel options outside of the IU Bloomington campus.  Some hotels are located within walking distance; some are a short drive from campus.  Check out the Visit Bloomington web site for off campus lodging.

Note:  Attendees electing to stay at off campus hotels who wish to drive to campus and park their car on campus may do so in the two parking lots adjacent to the Indiana Memorial Union.  There will be a fee for parking in these lots.  Discount parking passes will be available at the registration check-in desk for conference participants.  The approximate discounted parking fee is currently $12/day.   You may also purchase a Temporary Permit on the conference registration form.  The Temporary Permit will allow you to park in many IU parking lots and garages, but it is not valid for in the IMU lots.

Sponsors

Our Guests

Greil Marcus

Author, Critic


Greil Marcus is the author of “Mystery Train” (1975), “Lipstick Traces” (1989), “Dead Elvis” (1991), “The Old, Weird America” (1997), “The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice” (2006), “The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs” (2014), “Three Songs, Three Singers, Three Nations” (2015), and other books.  With Sean Wilentz he is the editor of “The Rose & the Briar: Death, Love and Liberty in the American Ballad” (2004) and with Werner Sollors of “A New Literary History of America” (2009). In recent years he has taught at Berkeley, the New School in New York, and the CUNY Graduate Center.  In 2017 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.  He lives in Oakland, California.

McKenzie Wark

Author


McKenzie Wark is a public intellectual, Cultural critic and scholar whose work draws on British Cultural Studies, German Critical Theory and French Poststructuralism, and who still manages to write prose that speaks to a non-academic audience.  He has written 16 books, including  A Hacker Manifesto (Harvard, 2004), Gamer Theory (Harvard 2007), and Molecular Red: Theory for the Anthropocene (Verso 2015).  More recently, he has begun exploring the art, writing and politics of the Situationist International [one of the French groups that informed the Mai 1968 activities in Paris] in such books as 50 Years of Recuperation of the Situationist International (Forum Project, 2008) The Beach Beneath the Street: The Everyday Life and Glorious Times of the Situationist International (Verso, 2011The Spectacle of Disintegration (Verso, 2013). Wark teaches at the New School in New York City and was an Eyebeam resident in 2007.

Annea Lockwood

Artist


Born in New Zealand in 1939, Annea Lockwood moved to England in 1961, studying composition at the Royal College of Music, London and completed her studies in Cologne and Holland, taking courses in electronic music with Gottfried Michael Koenig. During the 1960s she collaborated with sound poets, choreographers and visual artists, and also created a number of works which initiated her lifelong fascination with timbre and new sound sources. In 1969, Lockwood began a series of Piano Transplants (1969-82) in which defunct pianos were burned, drowned, beached, and planted in English gardens. In the decades to follow, she turned her attention to performance works focused on environmental sounds and life-narratives, often using low-tech devices. Since the early 1990s, she has written for a number of ensembles and solo performers, often incorporating electronics and visual elements. She has been commissioned by Bang on a Can, Thomas Buckner and the SEM Ensemble, and Merce Cunningham Dance Company, among many others and much of her music has been recorded on labels such as the Lovely, XI, Mutable, Pogus, EM Records, Rattle Records, Soundz Fine (NZ), Harmonia Mundi and Ambitus. Lockwood is also a recipient of the 2007 Henry Cowell Award.

Jim Hoberman

Author, Critic


J. Hoberman is an author, teacher and cultural critic. From 1978 through 2011 he wrote on film for The Village Voice; he has also written for numerous publications including Artforum, The London Review of Books, and The New York Times. He was the Gelb Professor of Humanities at Cooper Union and has lectured widely and taught cinema studies at Columbia, Harvard, and NYU. His 13 books include The Red Atlantis: Communist Culture in the Absence of Communism (Temple University Press); The Dream Life: Movies, Media, and the Mythology of the Sixties (The New Press); and Film After Film, or What Became of 21st Century Cinema (Verso).

Art of Rikki Ducornet

Author, Artist


The author of nine novels, three collections of short fiction, two books of essays and five books of poetry, Rikki Ducornet has received both a Lannan Literary Fellowship and the Lannan Literary Award For Fiction. She has received the Bard College Arts and Letters award and, in 2008, an Academy Award in Literature. She has illustrated books by Jorge Luis Borges, Robert Coover, Forrest Gander, Kate Bernheimer, Joanna Howard and Anne Waldman among others. Her collected papers including prints and drawings are in the permanent collection of the Ohio State University Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. In addition, solo exhibitions of her paintings have been mounted in the U.S., Portugal, Chile, Costa Rica, and Canada. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Museo de la Solidaridad Salvador Allende, Santiago Chile, The McMaster University Museum, Ontario, Canada, and The Biblioteque Nationale, Paris.

The Muttering Sickness

Artists, Scholars


The Muttering Sickness is a multimedia art collective that records, manipulates, and ‘derealizes’ audio and visual recordings. The group consists of trained artists and working academics who combine community, politics, and philosophy in their artistic practice that focuses on location, form that mirrors or addresses issues, and experimentation that stresses collage, intertextual editing, and the aesthetics of the “cut.” They make avant-garde, artistic techniques legible to a larger audience, and stress the relevance of such techniques to the community-building project of public art. The Whole World Is Watching is a site-specific, collaborative work that will draw on the resources of the Bloomington community to address and reconsider the events of the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention in an examination of what happens when radical art meets politics. Group members have extensive individual performance, production, and publication credits and include Davis Schneiderman (Associate Dean of the Faculty and Director of the Center for Chicago Programs and author of numerous books on William S. Burroughs and the Beats), Don Meyer (Professor of Music at Lake Forest College), Joshua Corey (Associate Professor of English at Lake Forest College and author of several books of poetry), Richard Pettengill (Chair and Associate Professor of Theater at Lake Forest College), and Kelly Haramis (Chicago Tribune, Woman’s World magazine).

Ken Vandermark + Phillip Sudderberg

Artists


Phillip Sudderberg is a Chicago-based drummer and educator active across a variety of the city’s creative-leaning communities. Phillip explores the possibilities of overtone, density, and fluidity on the drum set in ways that draw upon his study of both idiomatic and non-idiomatic musical traditions. These curiosities are examined via the creative application of extended techniques; via cliché, associative, and generic nuances available in rhythm; and via new physical preparations for the drum set and mbira. Over the past several years, these concerns have found a home in contemporary music ensembles, spontaneous improvised configurations, jazz ensembles, and in the rock bands Wei Zhongle and Spirits Having Fun. In 2012 Phillip cofounded Gilded Records and curates the ongoing Foundation Series in Chicago. In addition to ongoing work with artists the likes of Andrew Clinkman, Keefe Jackson, Steve Marquette, John McCowen, Macie Stewart, Ken Vandermark, and many more, Phillip actively seeks out new likely and unlikely collaborators for further growth as a listener and sound producer.

———————

Born in Warwick, Rhode Island on September 22nd, 1964, Ken Vandermark began studying the tenor saxophone at the age of 16.  Since graduating with a degree in Film and Communications from McGill University during the spring of 1986, his primary creative emphasis has been the exploration of contemporary music that deals directly with advanced methods of improvisation.  In 1989, he moved to Chicago from Boston, and has worked continuously from the early 1990’s onward, both as a performer and organizer in North America and Europe, recording in a large array of contexts, with many internationally renowned musicians (such as Fred Anderson, Ab Baars, Tim Barnes, Peter Brötzmann, Tim Daisy, Hamid Drake, Terrie Hessels, Mats Gustafsson, Elisabeth Harnik, Steve Heather, Didi Kern, Kent Kessler, Christof Kurzmann, Fred Lonberg-Holm, Paul Lytton, Lou Mallozzi, Lasse Marhaug, Joe McPhee, Andy Moor, Jason Moran, Joe Morris, Paal Nilssen-Love, Eddie Prevost, Eric Revis, Jasper Stadhouders, Chad Taylor, John Tilbury, Nasheet Waits, Mars Williams, Nate Wooley, and C. Spencer Yeh).

His current activity includes work with Made To Break, Marker, Lean Left, Shelter, DEK, The DKV Trio, Fire Room; duos with Paal Nilssen-Love, Tim Daisy, Terrie Hessels, and Nate Wooley, as well as work as a solo performer.  Since June of 2015 has been co-curator of Option, a music series held on a weekly basis at the Experimental Sound Studio in Chicago.  In 2014 he began an independent label, called Audiographic Records, created to document special aspects of his work through albums and books. More than half of each year is spent touring in Europe, North America, Russia, Brazil, and Japan, and his concerts and numerous recordings have been critically acclaimed both at home and abroad.  In addition to the tenor sax, he also plays the bass and Bb clarinet, and baritone saxophone.  In 1999 he was awarded the MacArthur prize for music.

Ward Shelley

Artist


Ward Shelley worked for thirty years as a sculptor, painter, and performance artist in Miami and Brooklyn, and he now has a home and studio in Connecticut.  Shelley’s installations sometimes include unique functioning architectural structures in which he lives and works while being monitored with live surveillance equipment.  Shelley also has produced an extensive series of diagramatic paintings, prints and drawings that are historical timelines of culture-related subjects.  He has said of his art, “I am an artist and I do a few different kinds of work. I think the main idea I work with is this: we live in a constructed world of our own devising, and that when you shape your world, it shapes you back.”

Of his “Timeline” paintings, Robin Cembalest wrote in ArtNews, “Ward Shelley renders cultural movements not so much as family trees but as elaborate living organisms…. the Brooklyn-based artist [has] chronicled the genesis of science fiction, the concept of the teenager, and the 4,000-year history of the Jewish people, among other themes, in intricate, convoluted diagrams that owe as much to strategies of contemporary data visualization as they do to illuminated manuscripts.”

Of his exhibition earlier this year titled “The Last Library” (2015–16), Tina Rivers Ryan wrote in Artforum, that it “riffs on Borges’s fantasy of a library containing all imaginable books. A collaboration with Douglas Paulson, these bookcases of titles that have not yet been written (e.g., Master a Fearful Rhetoric, by Newt Gingrich) are organized by whimsical criteria such as “books written at sea level” and are decorated with Carol K. Brown’s hand­painted knick­knacks and complemented by purpose­built wainscoting. Whereas the charts open up the past, the bookcases, like science fiction, open up the present by imagining an uncanny future. If the flip side of Bentham’s dream of better living through programming is the nightmare of total control (emblematized by his ‘Panopticon’), understanding that both the future and the past are up for grabs is a precursor of resistance.”

Shelley’s work has been exhibited in ten different countries, and has received international recognition for decades, featured repeatedly in publications such as Artforum, ARTnews, Art in America, Artnet News, the New York Times, the Village Voice, Bomb, Flash Art, and Kunstforum International.  His recent collaborations with artist Alex Schweder have also received media attention from CBS, NBC, the BBC, Reuters, Al Jazeera, Hyperallergic, Wall Street International, Smithsonian Magazine, The Telegraph, La Repubblica, and dozens of other media outlets.  (If you google “Ward Shelley ReActor” – (his latest project of just three months ago, a collaboration with Alex Schweder is titled “ReActor”) you will net over 180 entries.)

Shelley has been the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Joan Mitchell Foundation Award for Painting and Sculpture (2007-08), the Prix de Rome (2005-06),  the Installation/New Media “Bessie” Award (presented by the New York Dance and Performance Awards Committee and Dance Theatre Workshop, 2002), a New York Foundation for the Arts New Media Fellowship (2001), and a Jerome Foundation Award, in Sculpture (2001).

His work is included in at least eight major public collections, including among them the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Baltimore Museum, the Hood Museum, Deutsche Bank, the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and the Thyssen-Bornemizsa Art Contemporary in Vienna.