WBUR’s Asma Khalid to speak on ‘future of news’

The Media School Report • March 3, 2017
WBUR reporter Asma Khalid will talk about her experiences April 21. (Courtesy Stephen Voss/NPR)
WBUR reporter Asma Khalid will talk about her experiences April 21. (Courtesy Stephen Voss/NPR)

WBUR reporter Asma Khalid will wrap up the school’s spring Speaker Series with her talk, “From a Presidential Election to Podcasts: The Future of News,” at 2 p.m. April 21 in Presidents Hall.

Khalid  has covered issues ranging from politics and demographics to the Boston Marathon bombings to the trial of James “Whitey” Bulger for NPR and for WBUR in Boston.

She joined NPR’s election team early last year to focus on stories leading up to the 2016 election cycles. She explored how the Puerto Rico fiscal crisis would influence the Florida vote and interviewed “new millennials,” Obama-era young adults who would cast their first votes for president in 2016.

Khalid also used data to dig into demographic trends, such as the Perfect State Index she created to find the most “representative” U.S. state ahead of the 2016 primary season.

After the election, Khalid drew attention with her essay, “What It Was Like to Cover the Election as a Muslim,” where she described public reaction as she traveled the country talking to all kinds of voters, attending town halls and rallies, church suppers and diners. Hoosier-born Khalid, who wears a headscarf, said she often was the only “identifiably Muslim” person in the crowd, and she was shocked by harassment and mystified by questions, both of which she considers in the essay.

Khalid now is back at WBUR where, after witnessing technology’s effects on policy and politics, she leads BostonomiX, a new business and tech team exploring the innovation economy.

Previously, she worked as a producer for NPR’s Morning Edition, was an NPR reporting fellow and was a reporter for WAMU, NPR’s affiliate in Washington, D.C.

Her association with NPR is long, however, and she has said that she owes her journalism education to her experiences at the public broadcast network. She has worked as a producer for NPR’s Morning Edition, was an NPR reporting fellow and was a reporter for WAMU, NPR’s affiliate in Washington, D.C.

Khalid, a 2006 graduate of the IU journalism program, received a master’s degree in Middle Eastern studies from the University of Cambridge.

While visiting campus, Khalid will receive the IU Hutton Honors College Young Distinguished Alumni Award.

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