Online communication necessitates review of First Amendment theory, Fargo says

The Media School Report • Aug. 8, 2017
Associate professor Anthony L. Fargo (Maggie Richards, senior | The Media School)
Associate professor Anthony L. Fargo (Maggie Richards, senior | The Media School)

The global nature of online communication and the rising popularity of social media may necessitate a re-examination of First Amendment theory, according to research by associate professor Anthony Fargo.

Fargo’s paper, “Re-Imagining First Amendment Theory for the 21st Century: First Steps,” discusses five of the ways scholars and jurists have attempted to explain why free expression is extraordinarily protected in the United States Constitution’s First Amendment and argues that traditional First Amendment theory should be re-examined with new methods of communication in mind.

Fargo presented the paper in the Law Section of the International Association for Media and Communication Research annual conference in Cartagena, Colombia, July 16-22.

Fargo is the director of the Center for International Media Law and Policy Studies in The Media School and a board member of the Indiana Coalition for Open Government. His research interests include media law and the First Amendment.

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