Luke Walker

Luke Walker is a third year student at Indiana University, studying Public Relations. Spending his first year at Indiana State University, he developed a keen interest the art of storytelling and reporting. Upon entry into IU, he decided to concentrate his passion for writing and communication on Public Relations. An avid fan of music and a performer himself, he is interested in representing the arts in a professional manner. His motive intends to further the inclusion of the arts in the every day lives of members in society.



Projects by Luke Walker

Night with an Outlaw

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A line stretches all the way from the crowded front door of The Bluebird Nightclub to Global Gifts located on the other side of 6th St. in downtown Bloomington. There is a shining of spurs on the boots of country folk wearing multicolored flannels, and the occasional shirt that reads “Cody Jinks”. In the midst of the annual Lotus Festival, the line at the Bluebird seems to overtake the block at 6 p.m. on the crisp, pre-autumn evening of Sept. 30th. The sign on the marquee reads “CODY JINKS, WHITEY MORGAN, WARD DAVIS, SOLD OUT”.


A Day in the Studio

 

Bending and creating sound waves to create attractive melodies is not a new art form. However, it is an ongoing art form. Look inside Stellar Recording Studios to hear and visualize the process of making well recorded musical compositions. There is a certain mood and a certain intellect that must be obtained in order to work hour after hour, only to create something that might be used. Nonetheless, the sense of achievement, both artistically and mentally, can be seen behind the many doors of Stellar Recording Studios.


Outlaw Country Singer Sells Out The Bluebird

A line stretches all the way from the crowded front door of The Bluebird Nightclub to open doors of Global Gifts, located on the other side of 6th St. in downtown Bloomington. There is a shining of spurs on the boots of some country folk wearing multicolored flannels, and the occasional shirt that reads “Cody Jinks”. In the midst of the annual Lotus Festival, the line at the Bluebird seems to overtake the block at 6 p.m. on the crisp, pre-autumn evening of Sept. 30th. The sign on the marquee reads “CODY JINKS, WHITEY MORGAN, WARD DAVIS, SOLD OUT”.

 

The huge draw at the Bluebird is nothing new to Cody Jinks by now. He has been touring and playing shows for years, crafting a type of sound that challenges the standard ‘popcorn’ Country of today.  Just the night before he opened up for Aaron Lewis – former front man of post-grunge band Staind. At age 37, he has been traveling on a tour bus for months now and indulges, humbly, in every minute of it.

 

“I’ve been all around this country in vans, pickup trucks, mobile homes… Man, I’m 37 and I’ve only been on a tour bus for a year. We didn’t take the easy road, that’s for sure.”

 

Jinks has been recording and touring longer than some millennials’ life spans. Interestingly, he was immersed in country music as a child but found a love for metal as he got older. Upon the breakup of his metal band, Unchecked Aggression, in 2003, he took time off from making and releasing music. He then returned to his roots in country music in the mid-2000’s. He began writing and releasing music again, however, it is his breakout record, I Am Not the Devil, which debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard’s Country Albums chart in 2016 that makes him a fairly known artist. His notoriety has since become larger in the community of country fans since this release.

 

“Our [fans] are very much middle class, blue collar, hard working people and you know there are a lot of things going on in this country right now. I want to address that sparingly in my music, but the idea is, you know, you want to write songs where any person hears it and is like ‘Oh, okay, yeah I get that!’”

 

Jinks carries a mild manner, which may combat the interpretation of his opinions to some. His music speaks to a part of America that derives its way of life in tradition and ‘honky tonk’ methods. He is rooted in his beliefs, but does not admit to any political affiliation through his music. He is an artist who acknowledges his influence.

 

“You know, in the business, you are going to find that half of the people who listen to your music are going to hate what you said, or half of them may love it… People love to hear your songs, but they don’t want to hear your opinions.”

 

The country singer from Texas possesses an attitude of respect and dignity for all who listen to his music. His success is a direct result of his willingness to embrace independence, as he does not work with a label. He would agree that success is about getting in a van and doing it, no questions asked. Continuously toiling to make his music known, Jinks prefers a simplistic view on life and makes his message heard all while selling out The Bluebird in Bloomington, Indiana.

 

He lives and works by two tenets that he carries through all of his work, whether or not it relates to music.

 

“Two rules, man: Work hard and be nice.”