Anisha Daga

Anisha Daga is studying Media Advertising, Public Relations, as well as getting a certificate from Liberal Arts Management Program. She is currently the communications chair for Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research and is also on the marketing staff for Indiana Daily Student Newspaper. Her other passions include food and positivity. You can find some of her articles on Spoon University. After college, she hopes to work in New York City.



Projects by Anisha Daga

Guatemalan Stress Dolls

Click the pages above to my design.

When attending a large big ten school like Indiana University, it can be very difficult to find a place to fit in. Add in being from a different racial background and having different experiences compared to most students, and the task gets more difficult. However, Indiana University offers many resources on campus for students, including multiple cultural centers.


Crimson Cadence

Crimson Cadence is a co-ed apacella group at Indiana University.The group sings a variety of types of songs ranging from Pop to Jazz to Classical. Students from all majors and disciplines come together to destress and share their passion for music. Crimson Cadence provides its members a creative outlet as well as an encouraging and inclusive environment.


Guatemalan Worry Dolls Bring Solace to Students

When attending a large big ten school like Indiana University, it can be very difficult to find a place to fit in. Add in being from a different racial background and having different experiences compared to most students, and the task gets more difficult. However, Indiana University offers many resources on campus for students, including multiple cultural centers.

Located on East 7th street, the Latino cultural center also known as La Casa seeks to enhance the historical, political, and cultural awareness regarding Latin/os. The center facilitates this through various programs and services.

One of the more recent events that the Latino Cultural Center put on was a session on “Guatemalan worry dolls”. Latino students as well as other students gathered at 6pm in Latino cultural center to learn more about this tradition and make these dolls.

Lillian Casillas-Origel, director of the Latino Cultural Center showed students the simple but detailed process of creating a worry doll and explained its relevance.She easily connected how the traditions of the past relate to the experience of students today. She tells us “Guatemalan worry dolls date back to Mayan traditions combining legend, story, craft, and stress relief.”

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