Advisory Board

The center’s advisory board advises the director on potential research, teaching and service projects and potential partners and funders. Board members also provide researchers and students with access to people and organizations that can provide assistance to center projects.

The board members are:

Richard C. Balough of Balough Law Offices, LLC, in Chicago, focuses on privacy, intellectual property and working with start-up companies. He also serves as general counsel for small businesses. Balough has written articles on privacy and e-commerce for several publications, including the Computer & Information Law Journal, the American Bar Association’s Business Law Today, Marketing News, the Illinois State Bar Journal, and the Chicago Bar Association’s CBA Record.  He also authored a chapter on copyrights in the Illinois Institute of Continuing Legal Education’s Handbook on Intellectual Property Law. Before transitioning to a career in the law, he was an editor and reporter for the Chicago Daily News, the Miami Herald, the South Bend Tribune, and the (Bloomington, Ind.) Herald-Telephone. He obtained his undergraduate degree in journalism from Indiana University, where he served as editor of the Indiana Daily Student.

Karen T. Braeckel retired in 2015 as director of the Hoosier State Press Association Foundation after 10 years. She joined HSPA in 1999 as director of member services. As foundation director, she was chief executive of the Foundation, overseeing its services and programs, including the Eugene S. Pulliam Internships and conferences, events, contests and training seminars. Before joining HSPA, Braeckel worked at The Indianapolis Star and The Indianapolis News for 14 years in the Corporate and Community Affairs Department – eight as educational services manager. She also taught for 10 years at the elementary and middle school levels in four states and served as adjunct faculty at Butler University in Indianapolis. Braeckel holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Purdue University, a master’s in education from Butler University, a master’s in journalism from Indiana University and a graduate certificate in nonprofit management from Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis.

Daniel P. Byron is a partner in the Indianapolis law firm of Bingham Greenebaum Doll. He has experience in media law, intellectual property and complex business litigation. He earned his bachelor of arts and law degrees at Indiana University-Bloomington. In 2007, he was selected by the International Senior Lawyers Project to lead a team of West African attorneys working in Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone to end impunity for violence against journalists, publishers and broadcasters, and to fight laws limiting freedom of expression in those nations.

Jan M. Carroll is a partner in the Indianapolis office of Barnes & Thornburg LLP, where she practices product liability, professional liability, real estate and land use, commercial dispute and media law. She is a former reporter and editor for the Associated Press and contributes sections on Indiana law to the Media Law Resource Center’s 50-State Survey: Media Libel Law and the Open Government Guidepublished by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. She earned a bachelor of fine arts degree in journalism from Southern Methodist University and her law degree from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis.

Timothy A. Franklin is a senior associate dean in the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications at Northwestern University. Previously, he was the president of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida. He began his journalism career at the Chicago Tribune, where he rose from reporter to associate managing editor. He was the editor of The Indianapolis Star, the Orlando Sentinel and the Baltimore Sun and was managing editor in the Washington, D.C., bureau of Bloomberg News. Franklin also was the founding director of the National Sports Journalism Center at the Indiana University School of Journalism in Indianapolis. He won an IU School of Journalism Distinguished Alumni Award in 2012. While at the Sentinel, he was instrumental in creating “Sunshine Week,” an annual observance regarding access to public information. He is national co-chair of the Freedom of Information Committee for the American Society of News Editors.

James C. Goodale is a partner at Debevoise and Plimpton LLP in New York. He was a lawyer, general counsel and vice chairman for the New York Times Co., and represented the Times in four Supreme Court cases, including New York Times v. Sullivan, New York Times Co. v. United States (the Pentagon Papers case), and Branzburg v. Hayes. He was the chair of the Practising Law Institute’s Communications Law seminars from 1972 to 2007 and a law professor at Fordham University from 1986 to the present. He has authored dozens of articles in law reviews, newspapers, magazines and Internet publications. One of his law review articles, published in 1975, is often credited with inspiring judges to recognize a constitutional privilege allowing journalists to protect the identities of confidential news sources. He is the author of Fighting for the Press: The Inside Story of the Pentagon Papers and Other Battles.He earned his bachelor’s degree at Yale University and his law degree at the University of Chicago.

Lee H. Hamilton is the director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University and represented Indiana in the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. He was vice chairman of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, known as the 9/11 Commission, and co-chaired the Iraq Study Group, a bipartisan panel that assessed the situation in Iraq and in 2006 made recommendations on U.S. policy there. Currently he is co-chairman of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future. He has published two books on the legislative branch: How Congress Works and Why You Should Care and Strengthening Congress. He writes twice-monthly commentaries about Congress and what individuals can do to make representative democracy work better. He graduated from DePauw University and Indiana University School of Law.

Victor Jackovich is a former United States ambassador to Bosnia and Slovenia. He is the president of Jackovich International, a commercial and trading firm with offices in Washington, D.C.; Vienna, Austria; and Portoroz, Slovenia. He is an adviser on international affairs for several companies, including General Dynamics and Lockheed Martin. He is a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington and is on the boards of the Central and East European University Network and the Center for European Perspective. He is an alumnus of Indiana University.

Michael A. Johnson is a partner at Arnold & Porter LLP in Washington, D.C. His practice specializes in commercial cases involving complex financial issues and analysis. His practice also involves disputes related to financial institutions. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Pennsylvania and a master’s degree at the Indiana University School of Journalism. He earned his law degree at Georgetown Law Center, where he was elected to the Order of the Coif and was an editor of the Georgetown Law Review.

Charles H. Lichtman is a partner at Berger Singerman LLP in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where his practice focuses on complex commercial litigation and trial practice. Lichtman served as statewide lead counsel for the Florida Democratic Party from 2000 through 2008, overseeing election law and voter protection issues and also working extensively with the media during this period, particularly in the presidential elections of 2000, 2004 and 2008.  He is an alumnus of the Indiana University School of Journalism and earned his law degree at DePaul University’s College of Law.

Davan Maharaj was most recently editor of the Los Angeles Times Media Group. He was named editor in 2011 after serving in a variety of editing and reporting posts at the paper, including reporting from East Africa. As a reporter, he won the Ernie Pyle Award for Human Interest Writing for the series “Living on Pennies,” which inspired readers to donate thousand of dollars to aid agencies working in Africa. An investigative report he wrote about an attorney who inherited millions of dollars from his clients led to changes in California probate law. A native of Trinidad, Maharaj earned a degree in political science from the University of Tennessee and a master’s in law from Yale University.

Simon Morrison is a public policy manager for Google in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. He is responsible for Google’s government relations and public affairs in the region, focusing on copyright and other intellectual property issues. He joined Google in 2007. He holds degrees in English literature and African Studies from Macalester College and the University of Oxford.

Carrie Ritchie is a social business manager for IBM and is based in Indianapolis. Previously, she was the social media editor for The Indianapolis Star. She graduated from Indiana University with highest distinction in May 2008. While at IU, she earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism, a business foundations certificate and minors in marketing, French and psychology. She also was editor-in-chief of the Indiana Daily Student and a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority. She was a representative of the IU Journalism Alumni Board and is the executive director of EntouRaj for Kids, a non-profit tennis organization. She also is an adjunct instructor for The Media School.

Brian Spegele is a Knight-Bagehot fellow at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism for 2017-18. Previously, he was a reporter for The Wall Street Journal based in Beijing. He covered Chinese foreign policy, domestic politics and the energy sector. Spegele wrote about civil society growth, legal developments and ethnic unrest across the country. Before joining the Journal, he lived in the western Chinese city of Chengdu, where he completed an Indiana University Hazeltine Fellowship. He graduated with a degree in journalism and international studies from IU, where he won a Poynter Scholarship.

Mark Stephens, CBE, is a partner in Howard Kennedy LLP in London. His practice specializes in international law, appellate and complex litigation, and constitutional, human rights, intellectual property, privacy, freedom of information and other areas of media law. He was appointed by the Foreign Secretary to the FCO Free Expression advisory board and by the Lord Chancellor to be a Champion for the Community Legal Service. He chairs a number of bodies, including the University of East London and the Management Committee of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, Wolfson College, Oxford Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

Charles D. Tobin is a partner at Ballard Spahr LLP in Washington, D.C., and co-practice leader of the firm’s Media and Entertainment Law Group. He represents media clients on a variety of issues, including reporter’s privilege, access to information and copyright, as well as takedown requests, terms of use and privacy policies and drone use. He is a former reporter for the News-Press in Fort Myers, Florida. He earned his bachelor’s degree in journalism and his law degree at the University of Florida.

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