B.S. in Game Design: Electives

Game Design Electives

While your long-run career success requires breadth of knowledge, that first job you land will tap into your mastery of a single skill. Employers don’t hire media creators; they hire artists, programmers and managers.

To help you toward that single-skill mastery, consider your knowledge as T-shaped. The top of T is your experience in all relevant skills: art, sound, coding, management, design. You’ll accumulate those skills within our core course curriculum.

Electives are where you build the stem of your T, that area of expertise that you choose to pursue, the one that will set you apart from other job candidates. These electives allow you to explore relevant courses within The Media School as well as at IU through our collaborations with other campus programs. This flexibility allows you to specialize, to refine your career path.

Here’s how to start building your stem:

In addition to your core courses for the degree, you’ll select 15 elective credits. Nine must be within one of five groupings:

Art
Game art students focus on the production of 2D and 3D digital assets to spec, on timeline and under budget. They work on student teams as artists. Their primary collaboration channel is with the IU School of Art and Design.

See a list of Art elective courses

FINA-F 100 Fundamental Studio—Drawing (3 cr.) CASE A&H Development of visual awareness and coordination of perceptual and manual skills; seeing, representing, and inventing on an experimental, exploratory level in two dimensions. Includes placement, scale, volume, light, formal articulation, and investigations of graphic tools and media.

FINA-F 102 Fundamental Studio—2D (3 cr.) CASE A&H Color, shape, line, and value structures are studied as the basis for exploration of two-dimensional spatial relationships; includes investigation of conventional and invented tools and media.

FINA-S 200 Drawing I (3 cr.) CASE A&H P: F100, F101, and F102. Preliminary course for advancement in drawing, stressing basic visual awareness; seeing, representing, and technical command on a two-dimensional surface. Problems in handling placement, scale, space, volume, light, and formal articulation.

FINA-S 301 Drawing II (3 cr.) CASE A&H P: S200. Intermediate course in drawing from the model and other sources. Emphasis on technical command of the media in conjunction with the development of a visual awareness. Continued problems in the articulation of space, scale, volume, value, and linear sensitivity. May be repeated once.

FINA-D 210 Digital Art: Survey and Practice (3 cr.) CASE A&H Beginning class on digital media’s role in the world of art production and reception. Class emphasizes learning to use digital media to produce original, creative art work. Topics include digital imaging, communicative art, and interactivity. Credit given for only one of D210 or T230.

FINA-D 310 Interactive Multimedia (3 cr.) P: D210 or T230, and portfolio review. A study of the principles and fundamental techniques for creating multimedia projects that explore their potential for critical artistic expression. The course will examine issues specific to onscreen interaction and time-based media. Tools such as Flash, Dreamweaver, and other supporting programs will be covered. Credit given for only one of D310 or T330.

FINA-D 317 Video Art (3 cr.) CASE A&H P: F100, F101 or F102 or D210, or portfolio review. Exploration of the medium of video as an aesthetic expression. Time and sound are elements incorporated into visual composition’s traditional concerns. Emphasis on technical command of video camera and digital editing procedures in conjunction with development of a visual sensitivity. Readings and a research project are required. Credit given for only one of D317 or T320.

FINA-D 318 3D Computer Graphics (3 cr.) P: Consent of the instructor. Hands-on studio course exploring the technical development of three-dimensional computer graphics for state-of-the-art display systems. Students will investigate user-interface design, create 3D graphical environments, and explore the parallel drives toward content creation and visual aesthetics. Credit given for only one of D318 or T340.

FINA-D 410 Advanced Multimedia (1-6 cr.) P: D310 or T330, and permission of instructor. A broad range of aesthetic and conceptual issues related to digital material and electronic interactivity. Students are encouraged to develop art projects using digital multimedia, video, hypertext, or the incorporation of object-based media. Dialogue of timely issues through readings, screenings, websites, and gallery visits. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 20 credit hours in D410 and T430.

FINA-D 417 Digital Video (1-6 cr.) P: D317 or T320. Advanced study of video’s potential in contemporary fine art practice. Students will create a new visual vocabulary using the latest technology including high-definition video systems and interactive DVD authoring. Covers special effects and animation programs that allow artists to further explore the aesthetics of time-based media. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 20 credit hours in D417 and T420.

FINA-D 418 Computer Graphical Environments (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Students develop 3D graphic environments to visualize and conceptualize creative constructs for virtual environments, explore art and spatial simulation, including animation, interaction, lighting, and design. Dialogue of timely issues is encouraged based on readings, videos, CD-ROMs and visits to galleries, websites and alternative spaces. May be repeated for a combined maximum of 20 credit hours in D418 and T440.

FINA-S 250 Introduction to Design Practice (3 cr.) CASE A&H P: F100, F101, F102. Drawing and perception in the history and practice of visual communication, including a basic introduction to the field and exercises with pencil, marker, computer, and other tools, to produce symbols, letter forms, and symbol-letter combinations.

FINA-S 352 Production for the Graphic Designer (3 cr.) CASE A&H P: S351 and consent of instructor. A thorough set of practical exercises that combine design projects with related information about both presentation of ideas and printing of finished designs.

FINA-S 451 Graphic Design Problem Solving (1-20 cr.) P: S352 and consent of instructor. Professional problem solving in graphic design. Using a variety of mediums to communicate messages, students apply processes from printing to multimedia as appropriate for directed projects. May be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours.

Sound
Game sound students focus on music, sound effects and environmental sound. Their student team contribution involves audio assets. These students connect naturally with the IU Jacobs School of Music.

See a list of Sound elective courses

MSCH-P 353 Audio Production (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206, and MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283, with a grade of C- or higher, and consent of instructor. Intermediate-level hands-on production course that concentrates on the planning and production of audio materials for radio, video, and interactive media. Topics include sound theory, recording, and editing. Includes analog and digital technologies. Lab fee required. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P353 or TEL-T 353.

MSCH-P 369 Sound Design (3 cr.) P: One of MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283 or TEL-T 284 with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of instructor. Develops basic sound design technique for linear and nonlinear media (video, animation, games, and interactive content). Explores basic concepts of sound in the context of audiovisual relationships through production and analysis. Develops media communication skills through the use of sound and image. Lab fee required. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 369 or TEL-T 369.

MUS A102 Audio Techniques I (3 cr.) P: A101 Introduction to Audio Technology. Introduction to studio equipment and recording procedures including microphone use, basic studio techniques, editing concepts, and recording and signal processing equipment.

MUS A201 Audio Techniques II (3 cr.) P: A102 Audio Techniques I. Intermediate studio and recording procedures including signal processing, digital audio theory, and basic digital audio workstation techniques.

MUS A202 Audio Techniques III (3 cr.) P: A201 Audio Techniques II. Advanced digital audio theory including media production, audio for Internet, and advanced digital audio workstation techniques.

MUS A321 Sound for Picture Production (3 cr.) P: A202 Audio Techniques III. Study of audio production techniques for radio, video, film, and multimedia. Emphasis on mixing criteria for broadcast and visual productions.

Programming
Game coders focus on the technical tasks involved with building games using digital game engines. Their contribution to student teams involves combining assets and design specs into playable artifacts. Coders’ collaboration channel is the IU School of Informatics.

See a list of Programming elective courses

CSCI-A 201 Introduction to Programming I (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: Two years of high school mathematics or MATH-M 014. Fundamental programming constructs, including loops, arrays, and files. General problem-solving techniques. Emphasis on modular programming and developing good programming style. Not intended for computer science majors. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 201 and A 597.

CSCI-A 202 Introduction to Programming II (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-A 201 or A 304. Advanced programming techniques: user-defined functions and types, recursion vs iteration, parameter-passing mechanisms; Classic abstract data types and algorithms. Programming style. Object-oriented programming. Web programming. May be counted toward computer science major requirements if completed prior to CSCI-C212. Advanced programming techniques: user-defined functions and types, recursion vs iteration, parameter-passing mechanisms; Classic abstract data types and algorithms. Programming style. Object-oriented programming. Web programming. May be counted toward computer science major requirements if completed prior to CSCI-C212. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 202 and A 598.

CSCI-A 216 Digital Multimedia Concepts and Technologies (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 110, A 111, or equivalent computing experience. N & M In-depth introduction to the technologies of digital hardware and software relevant to efficient multimedia communication methods. Lectures focus on computational foundations, underlying concepts, and digital methods. Laboratory provides direct experience with concepts presented in lecture, using latest available digital tools to create direct and Web-based multimedia content. Lecture and laboratory.

CSCI-C 211 Introduction to Computer Science (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 211,  H 211 or A 591.

CSCI-H 211 Introduction to Computer Science, Honors (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: High school precalculus math. Honors version of CSCI-C 211. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-H 211, C 211 or A 591.

CSCI-C 212 Introduction to Software Systems (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-C 211. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 212,  H 212 or A 592.

CSCI-H 212 Introduction to Software Systems, Honors (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-C 211. Honors version of CSCI-C 212.  Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-H 212, C 212 or A 592.

CSCI-C 291 System Programming with C and Unix (1.5 cr.) P: CSCI-C 211 or CSCI-A 201. This course provides an introduction to programming in a Unix (Linux) environment using the C language. The key ideas to be discussed are: the Unix shell, file system and basic shell commands; the emacs text editor; and the C programming language.

CSCI-C 322 Object-Oriented Software Methods (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 212. Design and implementation of complex software systems and applications exploiting the object-oriented paradigm. Selection and effective utilization of object-oriented libraries and interfaces.

CSCI-B 351 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Computer Simulation (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-C 211. A survey of techniques for machine intelligence and their relation to human intelligence. Topics include modeling techniques, neural networks and parallel processing systems, problem-solving methods, vision, heuristics, production systems, speech perception, and natural language understanding. Credit not given for both CSCI-B 351 and COGS-Q 351.

CSCI-B 461 Database Concepts (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-C 241and C 343. Introduction to database concepts and systems. Topics include database models and systems: hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented; database design principles; structures for efficient data access; query languages and processing; database applications development; views; security; concurrency; recovery. Students participate in a project to design, implement, and query a database, using a standard database system. Credit not given for both CSCI-B 461 and B 561.

CSCI-P 465 Software Engineering for Information Systems I (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-C 343. CSCI-B 461. C: CSCI-B 461. Analysis, design, and implementation of information systems. Project specification. Data modeling. Software design methodologies. Software quality assurance. Supervised team development of a real system for a real client. Credit not given for both CSCI-P 465 and P 565.

CSCI-B 481 Interactive Graphics (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI-C 343 and MATH-M 301 or M 303. Computer graphics techniques. Introduction to graphics hardware and software. Two-dimensional graphics methods, transformations, and interactive methods. Three-dimensional graphics, transformations, viewing geometry, object modeling, and interactive manipulation methods. Basic lighting and shading. Video and animation methods. Credit not given for both 
CSCI-B 481 and B 581.

Design
“Game design students” in this context are those who specialize even further in the core focus of the curricular program—the design part of game creation. All design students work as designers on game teams, but there are two sub-groupings:

  • Game design theory
    Design theory students focus on formal understanding of strategic interactions. They pursue coursework in complex systems, economics and political science.
See a list of game design theory elective courses

ECON-E 321 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.) CASE S&H P: E201 and MATH-M 119 or M211. The economics of consumer choice. The economics of production, cost minimization, and profit maximization for business firms in the short run and long run under various market structures. Competition and adjustment to market equilibrium. Introduction to game theory, strategic interaction, and noncooperative equilibria. Credit given for only one of E321 or S321.

ECON-E 327 Game Theory (3 cr.) CASE S&H P: E321. Mathematical analysis of strategic interaction. Noncooperative games played once or repeatedly, with perfect or imperfect information. Necessary condition for a solution (equilibrium) as well as sufficient conditions (refinements). Cooperative games, such as bargaining and market games. Numerous applications, including experimental games.

ECON-E 351 Law and Economics (3 cr.) P: E321. Devoted to economic analysis of law, focusing on the economic efficiency of common law. Main components of the course are property law, contracts, and torts; some aspects of criminal law are also covered. Discussion is based mostly on examples, both invented and taken from actual cases.

ECON-E 385 Economics of Industry (3 cr.) P: E321. Empirical analysis of market structure and behavior. Location, technology, economies of scale, vertical integration, conglomerates, barriers to entry, and competitive practices. Economic assessment of product performance and environmental impact.

ECON-E 361 Public Finance: Government Spending (3 cr.) P: E321. Theory of public goods and externalities. Cost-benefit analysis. Public choice theory. Analysis of specific expenditure, transfer, and regulatory programs. Only 6 credit hours from E308, E361, and E362 may be counted toward a major in economics.

ECON-E 362 Public Finance: Taxation (3 cr.) P: E321. U.S. tax structure, income redistribution effects, and efficiency in resource allocation. Use of welfare theory and microeconomic models to evaluate particular issues. Only 6 credit hours from E308, E361, and E362 may be counted toward a major in economics.

ECON-E 370 Statistical Analysis for Business and Economics (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: E201 and MATH M118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts. R: MATH M119 and E202. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of E370 or S370, ANTH A306, CJUS K300, MATH K300 or K310, POLS Y395, PSY K300 or K310, SOC S371, STAT K310 or S300 or S301, or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

INFO-I 368 Introduction to Network Science (3 cr.). Friends, computers, the Web, and our brain are examples of networks that pervade our lives. Network science helps us understand complex patterns of connection, interaction, and relationships in many complex systems. Students learn essential concepts and core ideas of network literacy, and basic tools to handle social and information networks.

INFO-I 468 Advanced Network Science (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 368 Introduction to Network Science. Network theory and representations Statistical descriptors of networks, such as degree, strength, components, clustering, paths, density, betweenness, etc. Network growth and evolution models Small worlds: social networks, paths and Milgram’s experiment Scale-free networks, heterogeneity, robustness, percolation Homophily, locality, and search in networks Networks in the real world: Web, Facebook, Twitter Weighted networks: infrastructure and transportation networks, traffic Directed networks, link graphs, PageRank and search engines Communities, modularity and function Dynamics on networks; rumors, gossip, epidemics Tools and APIs to extract, manage, visualize, and model networks (NWB, Gephi, Python/NetworkX, and NetLogo).

MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) CASE MM, CASE N&M P: Two years of high school algebra or M014 or M018. Sets, counting, basic probability, including random variables and expected values. Linear systems, matrices, linear programming, and applications. Credit given for only one of M118, V118, S118, the sequence D116-D117, or A118.

MATH-K 310 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: M119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of K310 or K300, ANTH A306, CJUS K300, ECON E370 or S370, POLS Y395, PSY K300 or K310, SOC S371, STAT K310 or S300 or S301, or SPEA K300. I Sem., II Sem.

MATH-M 447 Mathematical Models and Applications I (3 cr.) P: M301 or M303, M311, M360 or M365, which may be taken concurrently, or consent of instructor. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. M447, I Sem.; M448, II Sem.

MATH-M 448 Mathematical Models and Applications II (3 cr.) P: M301 or M303, M311, M360 or M365, which may be taken concurrently, or consent of instructor. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. M447, I Sem.; M448, II Sem.

POLS-Y 204 Institutional Analysis and Governance (3 cr.) CASE S&H Introduces the design and development of political, economic, and social institutions that support democratic governance or its alternatives. Uses theory to understand connections among individual choice, collective action, institutions, and constitutional order. Institutional analysis as a mode of reasoning about contemporary policy problems, law, and public affairs.

POLS-Y 351 Political Simulations (1-3 cr.) A course tied to simulations of international organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, or the Organization of American States. May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

POLS-Y 395 Quantitative Political Analysis (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: MATH M118 or A118 or equivalent. Introduction to methods and statistics used in political inquiry, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, measures of association, analysis of variance, and regression. Credit given for only one of Y395, ANTH A306, CJUS K300, ECON E370 or S370, MATH K300 or K310, PSY K300 or K310, SOC S371, STAT K310 or S300 or S301, or SPEA K300.

POLS-Y 405 Models and Theories of Political Decision Making (3 cr.) CASE S&H P: One course in political science at the 200 level or above. R: ECON E201. Introduces collective choice and game theory for understanding how societies make political decisions. Examines how institutions, or the political context in which decisions are made, affect group choices. Theories of individual and group decision making, collective choice, and social dilemmas. Applications to congressional politics, intergovernmental relations, and parliamentary democracies.

STAT-S 300 Introduction to Applied Statistical Methods (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: MATH M014 or equivalent. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of STAT S300 or K310 or S301, ANTH A306, CJUS K300, ECON E370 or S370, MATH K300 or K310, POLS Y395, PSY K300 or K310, SOC S371, or SPEA K300.

STAT-K 310 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: MATH M119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of K310 or S300 or S301, ANTH A306, CJUS K300, ECON E370 or S370, MATH K300 or K310, POLS Y395, PSY K300 or K310, SOC S371, or SPEA K300.

  • Games and mind
    Mind students focus on scientific and philosophical understanding of human experience in strategic situations. Their partners are in IU’s departments of cognitive science and psychological and brain science.
See a list of games and mind course electives

COGS-Q 301 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.) CASE N&M R: PSY P101. An introduction to the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognition, and a survey of topics in neuroscience related to cognition. The course provides a solid background in human biopsychology. If Q301 is not offered in a given year, PSY P423 Human Neuropsychology may be substituted for this course.

COGS-Q 330 Perception/Action (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: PSY-P 101 or P 155. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 330 or PSY-P 330.

COGS-Q 350 Mathematics and Logic for the Cognitive and Information Sciences (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in the cognitive and information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability, and statistics, together with short introductions to formal semantics and dynamical systems. Credit given for only one of COGS Q350 or Q250.

COGS-Q 351 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Computer Simulation (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: CSCI C211 or consent of instructor. A survey of techniques for machine intelligence and their relation to human intelligence. Topics include modeling techniques, neural networks and parallel processing systems, problem-solving methods, knowledge representation, expert systems, vision, heuristics, production systems, speech perception, and natural language understanding. Students who have completed both C463 and C464 are exempted from taking this course. Credit not given for both COGS Q351 and CSCI B351.

COGS-Q 360 Autonomous Robotics (3 cr.) P: Two semesters of computer programming or consent of instructor. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. Includes basic mechanics, electronics, and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of Q360 or CSCI B355.

COGS-Q 370 Experiments and Models in Cognition (4 cr.) CASE N&M P: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. R: PSY K300 or equivalent familiarity with statistics. This course develops tools for studying mind and intelligence, including experimental techniques, and mathematical and computational models of human behavior. Topics include neural structures for cognition, attention, perception, memory, problem solving, judgment, decision making, and consciousness. Students will design and analyze laboratory experiments and apply formal models to the results. Credit given for only one of COGS Q370 or Q270.

PSY-P 330 Perception/Action (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 330 or COGS-Q 330.

PSY-P 335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: P101 or P106 or P151 or P155. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

PSY-P 350 Human Factors/Ergonomics (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: P155 or P101 or P151 or P106. Theories and data of experimental psychology applied to the problems of the interaction of people and technology.

PSY-P 430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.) P: P324 and P325 or consent of instructor. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions.

PSY-P 437 Neurobiology of Addictions (3 cr.) CASE N&M P: P101 or P106 or P155, and P346, and two biology courses (e.g., L112, L211). (Concurrent enrollment in P346 and biology courses only with permission of the instructor.) Provides an in-depth look at the neurobiological bases of addictions, from the cellular, molecular, and systems neuroscience levels of analysis.

PSY-P 453 Decision-making and the Brain (3 cr.) P: P326 or P335 or P346. An exploration of how individuals make decisions and what different parts of the brain contribute to decision-making. Focuses on the cognitive psychology of decision-making and on exciting recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of decision-making, including the new field of neuroeconomics.

Management, Advertising and Public Relations
These students focus on the marketing and business aspects of game design. They work on teams in a managerial capacity, seeking later work as producers, managers and executives. Their primary collaboration is within the Media School’s public relations, advertising and management programs.

See a list of Management, Advertising and Public Relations elective courses

MSCH-A 315 Advertising and Consumer Culture (3 cr.) CASE S&H Critical examination of advertising’s role in modern societies. Focuses on marketing and consumption as central activities in shaping personal identity and social relations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 315 or CMCL-C 315.

MSCH-A 320 Principles of Creative Advertising (3 cr.) Analysis of strategy employed in developing creative advertising, with emphasis on role of the copywriter. Research, media, legal aspects, ethical standards as they apply to the copywriting functions. Place of the creative function within the advertising agency and the retail business. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 320 or JOUR-J 320.

MSCH-A 337 Electronic Media Advertising (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Principles of Internet, network, national spot, and local radio and television advertising; roles of advertising agency, station representative, time buyer. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 337 or TEL-T 340.

MSCH-A 347 Media Promotion and Marketing (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of designing, implementing, and evaluating promotional materials and marketing campaigns for television programs, radio formats, cable services, the Web, and new media. Credit given for only one of A347 or TEL-T 347.

MSCH-A 420 Advertising Concepts and Copywriting (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 226 or JOUR-J 210, and MSCH-A 320 or JOUR-J 320. Intensive practice in producing effective advertising concepts, copy, and design prototypes for newspaper, magazine, direct mail, outdoor, radio, television, and converged campaigns. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 420 or JOUR-J 420.

MSCH-A 438 Advertising Issues and Research (3 cr.) P: MSCH-A 320 or JOUR-J 320 and junior/senior standing, or permission of instructor. Seminar in current developments in advertising as an economic and social force. Examines contemporary issues in the profession. Students will conduct independent and original research projects. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 438 or JOUR-J 438.

MSCH-A 441 Advanced Advertising Strategies (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207, and MSCH-A 337 or TEL-T 340, all with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of instructor. Analysis and evaluation of planning, creative, and placement components of advertising campaigns utilizing the electronic media; development of original advertising campaigns. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 441 or TEL-T 441.

MSCH-M 330 Production Management (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206, and MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283, with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of instructor. The management of commercial and noncommercial telecommunications projects, including television and news media. Organizational, economic/ business, and legal aspects of production management. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 330 or TEL-T 330.

MSCH-M 421 Economics of Communications Industries (3 cr.) CASE S&H P: MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Analysis of market structure and behavior of firms and organizations in broadcasting, cable television, motion picture distribution, print media, common carrier, and other communications industries. Policy and strategy applications. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 421 or TEL-T 421.

MSCH-M 422 Business Applications in Telecommunications (3 cr.) CASE S&H P: MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Topical seminar on social and business applications of telecommunications. Exploration of the potential for delivering public and business services via the telecommunications network. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-M 422 and TEL-T 422.

MSCH-M 446 Telecommunications Management (3 cr.) P: MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Study of the skill, processes, and attitudes required for effective management and leadership at all levels in telecommunications operations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 446 or TEL-T 446.

MSCH-R 321 Principles of Public Relations (3 cr.) Survey course about theory and practice of public relations. Examines PR function within organizations, its impact on publics, and role in society. Topics include the evolution of the field, the range of roles and responsibilities that practitioners assume, ethics, and significant issues and trends. Credit given for only one of MSCH-R 321 or JOUR-J 321.

MSCH-R 349 Public Relations Writing (3 cr.) P: One of MSCH-C 225, MSCH-H 225, JOUR-H 200 or JOUR-J 200; and one of MSCH-R 321 or JOUR-J 321 with a grade of C- or higher. Develops the professional writing skills expected of beginning public relations practitioners, including different approaches required for a variety of audiences and media. Focus on the basics of good writing as well as the art of writing. Brush up on AP style. Learn how to work effectively with real-world clients. Credit given for only one of MSCH-R 349 or JOUR-J 349.

MSCH-R 428 Public Relations Planning and Research (3 cr.) P: MSCH-R 321 or JOUR-J 321 and junior/senior standing, or permission of instructor. Theories and principles relevant to public relations research and strategic planning, including development of goals and objectives, client relationships, budgets, and research methods. Credit given for only one of MSCH-R 428 or JOUR-J 428.

MSCH-R 429 Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.) P: MSCH-R 321 or JOUR-J 321 with a grade of C- or higher. Development and execution of a public relations campaign for a non-profit organization. Public relations theory and in-depth care study analysis. Develop a campaign proposal to meet a client’s business objectives and learn how to pitch it. Part of the course focuses on media relations and crisis communications training. Credit given for only one of MSCH-R 429 or JOUR-J 429.

General electives:

For the remaining six credits, you may choose from study abroad courses, other courses at The Media School or from other IU schools and departments. These include:

  • Any Media School courses, such as film production and visual storytelling, reporting, communication research, criticism and cultural studies, Web design and others.
  • Study abroad courses in the DIS Study Abroad Program in Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Human Computer Interaction courses in the School of Informatics and Computing:
    • INFO-I 300 HCI/Interaction Design (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 and I 202. The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current HCI designs with an eye toward what future technologies will allow. The course will emphasize learning HCI based on implementation and testing interfaces. Credit given for only one of INFO-I 300 or H 300.
    • INFO-H 300 HCI/Interaction Design, Honors (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 and I 202. Honors version of INFO-I 300. The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current HCI designs with an eye toward what future technologies will allow. The course will emphasize learning HCI based on implementation and testing interfaces. Credit given for only one of INFO-I 300 or H 300.
    • INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 300. The study of the evolution of media arts and underlying principles of communication. Application development paradigms in current practice.
  • Other courses by exception with permission from the director of undergraduate studies.

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